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Home » Kids and Allergies

Nothing says love – or clueless – like a peanut butter cup

Submitted by on Thursday, 11 February 2010 No Comment
First, the good news:

Big Guy immediately recognized the Reese's Cup in his bag of Valentine's Day bling at school - never mind that the kids weren't supposed to bring candy and I'd ticked Big Guy off this morning by insisting that he honor the request.

He brought it to his teacher's attention, and she quickly called me for advice on how to proceed. She told me that the candy was in its original wrapper - thank heaven it wasn't special Valentine's Day packaging or Big Guy might not have caught it. Note to self: Teach Big Guy to read "Reese's" and "Snickers."

I told her she could remove the Reese's from Big Guy's bag and let him keep the rest of it, with a reminder not to eat anything until he got home and I could go over it.

She also said any kids caught eating candy in class would have to donate it to her and then go wash their hands.

Whew. My heart rate returned to normal.

Still, I wondered who would send a Reese's cup to a class with peanut-allergic children.

The parents have been told since Big Guy arrived, two days into the school year, that it was to be a peanut-free class. They were reminded just a week ago:  Due to food allergies, do not send food for Valentine's Day.

Was it someone who managed to miss the memo - several of them? Was it someone who thought the teacher had nothing better to do than play candy police. These are first-graders - there's a decent chance someone would try to sneak into the stash.

Was it someone unaware that people with serious peanut allergies such as Big Guy's can have reactions if they touch something that someone who's touched peanuts has touched?

Or - and this possibility bothers me that most - was it someone like the commenters on this story who want to lecture me about taking responsibility for my child so they can be blithely irresponsible? Someone who, out of all the candy in all the stores in all the world, just had to send a peanut butter cup to my kid's class because his or her kid loves them so much.

How would they feel if I'd sent a heart-shaped bottle of Drano?

A mom at soccer practice last night, who's bringing the snack tonight, specifically asked for a list of items that would be safe for Big Guy. I thanked her at the time, but this evening I think I'll grab her around the knees and hug her.

Copyright 2010 Debra Legg.

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