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Let Dugard find her way in peace

Submitted by on Saturday, 29 August 2009 One Comment
Big Guy bristled when I refused to let him out of my line of vision yesterday evening at the PX, when he went to fetch to pile of pepper he has to have on his fries these days.

"Mom! Stop looking at me! I can get it myself!"

He misinterpreted my watchful eye. I know he could do it. I also knew he'd have to jump and boost himself onto the counter to pull it off. He thought he was going to get in trouble for climbing, but that wasn't my concern.

Jaycee Dugard was.

I know, I know. Despite stories of kids like Dugard and Steven Stayner and Elizabeth Smart, children rarely are kidnapped. It's even rarer that a stranger would do it.

Yet, it does happen. And in this case, a sweet-faced 11-year-old cheerleaders is going back to her mother after 18 years locked away in 6-foot-tall sheds, with no school, no doctors and probably limited access to anyone beyond those who kidnapped her.

She had two babies, the first when she was only 13. Did she even know what was happening to her? What warped stores had her captors concocted? How on Earth does a child-woman even begin to live a normal life after almost two decades in such a warped world?

I have no idea. I doubt anyone does, because there's just no point of reference for a child coming home after that many years. What does home even mean to her? Is it the shed with the outhouse and extension cords? Or has she managed to hang on to visions of her stolen childhood and remember, somewhere in the back of her mind, that that time was normal.

I'll admit, I'm curious. But my curiosity shouldn't be satisfied at the expense of a family that's already suffered so much. A family who's road to anything approaching normal will be long and painful.

I hope the family is able to find its way in privacy. If they want to talk about it in public, well and good.  They'll have to do so if there's a trial. Anything beyond that is strictly their call.

Public discussion can be cathartic for some people. But if they don't want to discuss it, I hope the world will leave them alone to do what they need to do.

And I hope the people who caused all the pain rot in jail.

Copyright 2009 Debra Legg. All rights reserved.

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One Comment »

  • Leslie K. said:

    I don’t care how old they get – when ‘my’ kids are out of my sight, I worry and pray. YOU KEEP WATCHING THOSE BIG AND LITTLE GUYS…even when they are 25.