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Home » Food, Simple Gifts

Finally finding a market for cookies in a jar

Submitted by on Friday, 19 December 2008 No Comment
I never could figure out who cookie-mix gift packs were aimed at.

Think about it: If you don't like to bake, adding a few ingredients and turning on the oven is going to be too much effort. And if you like to bake, a mix is no fun. Some kitchen snobs -- that would be me -- actually find them a bit insulting.

I clued in this year: Cookies in a jar are actually good gifts for kids interested in learning to bake. That's why we're giving several.

With a recipe adapted from a long-ago cookbook from Crisco, it's easy to crank out a big batch at once. Add a bit of decoration to the jar, print instructions on the gift card, maybe add a cookie sheet or dough scoop and you're finished.

First, start with the base mix:

  • 4 c. flour
  • 2 c. sugar
  • 1 1/2 c. brown sugar
  • 2 tsp. baking power
  • 1 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1 1/3 c. shortening

Combine dry ingredients in a large bowl. Cut in shortening with a pastry blender or two knives. You'll have enough mix for three batches, with a smidge left over.

Then divide into gift-size batches:

  • 2 3/4 c. cookie mix
  • 1 c. chocolate chips, raisins, coconut, chopped dates or butterscotch chips

Next, create your instruction card:

To make your cookies, add 1 egg and 3 tbl. milk to the jar. Stir until blended. Drop by tablespoonfuls onto ungreased cookie sheet. Bake at 375 degrees for 10 to 12 minutes.

Easy, eh?

If you're making the gift for an egg-allergic home, change the instructions to "add one egg's worth of replacer and 5 tbl. milk."

If you're creating it for a peanut-allergic person, be careful with the baking chips. Store-brand chocolate chips usually are safe. Guittard is the only butterscotch I've found that will work.

Copyright 2008 Debra Legg. All rights reserved.

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