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Home » Food, Kids and Allergies

Kids and Allergies: Egg-free pumpkin streusel pound cake

Submitted by on Friday, 7 November 2008 No Comment
Credit tonight's recipe to Big Guy's last-minute switcharoo.

Yesterday, he wanted banana cake -- I let the guys take turns picking treats. I planned accordingly, dutifully removing the overripe offerings from the freezer to thaw.

This evening, though, presto-change-o. "Can you make pumpkin cake?"

Uh, why, yes. I can make at least three varieties of pumpkin cake and a couple of breads, too. But I've never converted any of the recipes to egg free.

I try to teach the guys not to automatically say "I can't," so I gave my politically correct answer. "I don't know. But I can try. But you remember how many times I goofed up the lemon pound cake before I got it right, don't you? This might not work."

I thumbed through index cards and found a pumpkin streusel cake I had everything I needed to make. It scared me, though, because it called for four eggs and I've never successfully converted a recipe using more than two. Dang me and my big mouth.

I compared the eggy recipe to egg-free pound cakes in Rosemarie Emro's most excellent "Bakin' Without Eggs" and decided to try working in a little sour cream. Because the recipe already was heavy on oil and pumpkin that also could serve as binders and leavening, it just might work.

Miraculously, it did, and without picking up too much of a sour cream cake. It's moist, but not "falling apart" moist, even though I used half whole-wheat flour. Big Guy hasn't tasted it yet, but he pronounced the smell "scrumptious." I have no idea where he learned that word.

I didn't make the streusel version, because I wasn't going to put that much effort into something that might fail. But there's no reason it won't work.

And if you're interested in the original version, simply leave out the sour cream and egg replacer and use four eggs.

Pumpkin streusel pound cake.
  • 1/2 c. firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 1/2 c. chopped nuts
  • 1 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 16 ounce can of pumpkin
  • 2 c. sugar -- I cut it to 1 1/2
  • 1 1/4 c. vegetable oil
  • 4 tbl. Bob's Red Mill egg replacer mixed in 1/2 c. warm water and beaten -- this is a departure from package instructions on water.
  • 1/2 c. sour cream
  • 3 1/4 c. flour - I used half whole wheat. I bet graham would be good, too.
  • 2 tsp. baking powder
  • 2 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 4 tsp. pumpkin pie spice
  • 2 tbl. margarine
Combine brown sugar, nuts and cinnamon; set aside

Beat pumpkin, granulated sugar, oil and sour cream in a large bowl until smooth. Add egg replacer, mixing well.

Gradually add 3 c. flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and pumpkin pie spice. Mix well.

Pour half of batter in greased Bundt pan -- I used baking spray. Top with 1/2 c. brown-sugar mixture. Top with remaining batter.

Add the remaining 1/4 c. flour to the remaining brown sugar mixture. Cut in butter until mix resembles coarse crumbs. Sprinkle over batter, pressing lightly.

Bake at 350 degrees for one hour. Cool in pan for 15 minutes, remove. Glaze with 1 c. powdered sugar mixed with 5 to 6 teaspoons of water if desired. The guys do not desire. Must have squiggles of gaudy-colored frosting and sprinkles in this house.

Everyone's review:

For once we're all in agreement. This is a great cake -- or maybe we were just starved for something different. Texture is almost pumpkin bread-like, taste is fantastic. I'm not picking up a sour cream taste at all.

Copyright 2008 Debra Legg. All rights reserved.

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